How to Become a Registered Environmental Health Specialist?

Environmental health specialists work to protect people from harmful exposures in the environment. Find out how to become a registered environmental health specialist.

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Introduction

Environmental health specialists work to protect the public from environmental hazards. They inspect and monitor workplaces, food-service establishments, and water supplies to ensure that they meet safety standards. They also investigate complaints of environmental health problems. To become an environmental health specialist, you need at least a bachelor’s degree in environmental science or a related field. Most states also require certification by the National Environmental Health Association or the American Academy of Sanitarians.

What is an Environmental Health Specialist?

An Environmental Health Specialist is a professional who works to protect public health by ensuring that the environment is safe. They do this by inspecting and testing products, investigating complaints, and enforcing laws and regulations.

To become an Environmental Health Specialist, you will need to complete a bachelor’s degree in environmental health, as well as pass a state-level exam. Some states also require that you complete a period of on-the-job training.

The Duties of an Environmental Health Specialist

An environmental health specialist is a professional who works to protect public health by identifying and investigating sources of pollution and contamination. These specialists are often employed by state or local government agencies, but may also work in the private sector.

Environmental health specialists typically have a bachelor’s degree in environmental science or a related field. Some jobs may require certification from the National Environmental Health Association or similar organizations.

The duties of an environmental health specialist vary depending on their particular job, but generally involve conducting inspections of businesses and public places, investigating complaints of pollution or contamination, and collecting samples of Hazardous waste for testing. Environmental health specialists may also develop and implement programs to educate the public about ways to prevent exposure to toxins and pollutants.

The Educational Requirements of an Environmental Health Specialist

In order to become an environmental health specialist, you will need to complete at least a bachelor’s degree in environmental health, although many employers prefer candidates who have completed a master’s degree. After completing your degree, you will need to pass the national Registered Environmental Health Specialist/Registered Sanitarian (REHS/RS) exam administered by the National Environmental Health Association. Once you have passed the exam, you will need to complete continuing education requirements every year in order to maintain your registration.

The Certification Process of an Environmental Health Specialist

The certification process of an Environmental Health Specialist is not an easy task. It requires a lot of dedication and hard work. However, it is worth it because becoming a Registered Environmental Health Specialist (REHS) allows you to work in a variety of settings and provides you with the opportunity to make a difference in the community.

The first step in becoming an REHS is to complete an accredited environmental health program. Once you have completed a program, you must then pass the National Environmental Health Association’s (NEHA) certified food protection manager (CFPM) exam. After passing the CFPM exam, you will be required to submit an application to the NEHA for certification.

Once you have been certified, you will need to renew your certification every three years by completing continuing education credits and passing the NEHA’s certified professional in food safety (CPFS) exam.

The Job Outlook for an Environmental Health Specialist

More than ever, people are focused on the safety of their food and water supply. With an aging population and the rise of chronic diseases, the demand for qualified environmental health specialists is expected to continue to grow.

A career as an environmental health specialist can be very rewarding. You will have the satisfaction of knowing that you are helping to protect people from foodborne illnesses and other health hazards.

The job outlook for an environmental health specialist is very good. Employment of environmental health specialists is expected to grow 11 percent from 2018 to 2028, faster than the average for all occupations.

The Salary Range for an Environmental Health Specialist

In the United States, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the median salary for an environmental health specialist is $69,710 per year. The salary range for an environmental health specialist varies depending on experience and location, but typically falls between $54,690 and $89,790 per year.

The States with the Highest Employment Level for Environmental Health Specialists

There is a great demand for environmental health specialists in the United States. The top five states with the highest employment level for this profession are California, Texas, Illinois, New York, and Pennsylvania.

The Metropolitan Areas with the Highest Employment Level for Environmental Health Specialists

The table below shows the metropolitan areas with the highest employment level for environmental health specialists as of May 2019.

The Top Paying States for Environmental Health Specialists

The top paying states for environmental health specialists are Massachusetts, Alaska, California, Hawaii, and Washington, D.D.C. The average annual salary for an entry-level position is around $30,000, while the average annual salary for a top-level position is around $90,000.

There are many different ways to become an environmental health specialist. The most common way is to have a degree in environmental health science, but there are many other ways to qualify for the job. You can find more information about how to become an environmental health specialist on the website of the National Environmental Health Association.

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